Categories
Live

Top tips for more sustainable shopping practices

1. Less is always more

Image result

Photo source: Round Two

We all have far too much stuff.

UCLA have named contemporary society the most materially rich society in global history (BBC). Even in the smallest house they studied (980 sq ft), they found 2,260 items in just the 2 bedrooms and living room – and this doesn’t include anything found in cupboards or drawers! They also found that 3 out of every 4 families no longer have space for a car in their garage because it’s filled with all of their stuff! James Wallman cleverly coined our obsession with material goods “Stuffocation”, and we truly are stuffed.

We’re especially bad when it comes to clothing. The average British woman buys 59 items of clothing a year and has double the amount she had in 1980. This is a waste of our money, our resources and our time.

A study by M&S found we only wear 44% of the items sitting in our wardrobe regularly (Oxfam). 3.6 million clothes are left unworn in Britain alone, an average of 57 items per person with 16 only ever being worn once and 11 still with tags. They also found 1 in 20 has 50 items with the tags still firmly attached – think what you could buy with 50 items worth!

And all this wardrobe cramming is also causing us unnecessary stress in the morning. Women spend on average 17 minutes a day choosing their outfit – that’s 4 whole days a year! And this morning madness sees 1 in 10 of us arriving late for work because we were struggling with what to wear that morning!

So when you’re out shopping, really take the time to think about whether you need that item. Do you already have one similar? How much use will you really get out of it? This leads me on to my next tip…

Categories
Live

Health and Wellbeing in the Retail Environment


Photo: Marks & Spencer Cheshire Oaks

The World Green Building Council (WGBC) released a report on Monday regarding health, wellbeing and productivity within the retail environment. A number of retailers are looking at how they can improve the experience of employees and customers in their stores. The retail environment, for example the lighting, indoor air quality, thermal comfort etc., can impact employees perception of the work space with a direct impact on staff retention and sickness rates. Similarly, it can impact customer perceptions and therefore sales, footfall and customer loyalty. This report forms one of the first major outputs from the WGBC’s Better Places for People campaign.