Categories
Exercise Previous Classes

Who made my Activewear?

As the fitness and wellness industries continue to expand with more people seeking healthier and more active lifestyles, sales of Activewear are soaring (Business Insider, 2017). Activewear forms part of the fashion industry which is known for devastating environmental impacts and exploitation of workers globally (Fashion Revolution). Whilst there are incredible movements towards a more purposeful fashion industry, there seemed to be little focus on Activewear. I wanted to organise an event that connected consumers with the hands that made their Activewear, highlighted wellness brands who put sustainability at the heart of their business, and supported Fashion Revolution’s efforts to stimulate change for a better fashion industry. This led me to host Who made my Activewear?, a mini sustainability in wellness festival seeking to encourage more mindful consumption in the wellness industry and fundraise for Fashion Revolution.

Who made my Activewear? took place on Saturday 28th April 2018 at Benk + Bo in London, during Fashion Revolution Week. There was a pop-up shop, classes for mind and body, and an ‘Ethics in Activewear’ panel discussion.

As part of the event, six purposeful Activewear brands shared information on their fabrics and the factories they work with to provide greater transparency over their supply chains and connect consumers with the hands behind their Activewear: Adrenna London, Jilla Active, Silou London, Sports Philosophy, Starseeds and VYAYAMA. You can read what these brands had to say at www.whomademyactivewear.com

7M6A9324.JPG

Founders or representatives from each brand spoke on the ‘Ethics in Activewear’ panel discussion hosted by Heather Knight from Fashion Revolution. Heather started the panel with her tips for a more sustainable sportswear wardrobe: buy less, make it last, fix it when broken, swap with friends, buy second hand and buy from conscious brands who use recycled, natural or innovative fibres. The brands then discussed how they’re addressing their social and environmental impacts, from using lower impact materials, working closely with their factories to ensure fair and safe conditions and looking to minimise the environmental impacts of packaging and distribution. They also touched on the challenges they face as small brands with little leverage in factories supplying some of the largest Activewear brands globally. It was an insightful hour behind the scenes of purposeful Activewear brands and I was overwhelmed with the incredible turnout that just about managed to fit into the beautiful Benk + Bo ground floor.

7M6A9279.JPG

All six brands could be found at the pop-up shop, as well as other incredible wellness, lifestyle and beauty brands including: Rêve En Vert, AmaElla, Optiat, Nitara London, Home of Eco and YogaClicks. It was so wonderful to see people connect with these brands, ask questions and consider the impact of their purchases.

7M6A91037M6A91287M6A9138

The classes included the perfect start to the morning with Caleb George‘s Early Risers Yoga and Phoebe Greenacre‘s Rise and Shine Vinyasa Flow to ensure you woke up well. I then taught BarreBodyLondon, Chiara Pellegrino’s butt-burning barre method, for those wanting a Saturday sweat. Our afternoon finished with Corinne Naomi‘s Contemporary Mat Pilates where you certainly felt your core, and Natalia Bojanic‘s beautiful meditation session Gratitude is Gold.

C831FCD4-1584-4B6A-B2B6-05BAA5C1BFBB.JPG

We also had a Circular Design Station ran by Felicitas Olschewski where you could learn about the principles of circular economy and design your own Activewear outfit with those in mind. Runway rental service Wear The Walk very kindly donated a voucher for the design competition winner, Fiona Cartmel!

F6AE942E-AB64-4344-A192-08134628E9B7.JPG

To further fundraise for UK charity Fashion Revolution, we had a raffle with fantastic prizes from conscious wellness brands including Joe’s Tea Co., Yuhme, Freda, Natural Deodorant Co., and Danielle Copperman.

Overall, we raised a total of £125 for Fashion Revolution and gathered more than one hundred people to discuss mindful consumption and discover purposeful wellness brands. I hope this is just the start of championing sustainability in the fitness and wellness industries. I’ve already discovered a number of new Activewear brands striving to build their business addressing key environmental, social and economic impacts. We as consumers have the power to change the industry by asking questions and voting for the world we want with our wallets.

A special thanks to Domenic Pendino for capturing the action, to Eliza, Lily, Rose and Soph for being the best of friends and saving the day to help me out, to Oliver Ferris for being my rock, putting up with all the emails and organisation and project managing the day, and to all of those that came to support the event!

You can find out more about the event at  www.whomademyactivewear.com or on the event’s Instagram page.

Categories
Dress Exercise

Consciously curating your collection of activewear

When we think about a capsule wardrobe, we wouldn’t usually include our activewear. It makes sense, I mean you wouldn’t pair a neon yellow sports bra with your black tailored work trousers (or maybe you would? I guess it depends on your personal style…). But this means we often neglect to consider the sustainability of our workout wear. The all-encompassing textiles industry is one of the most resource intensive and environmentally polluting industries globally. With the fitness and wellness industries booming, more and more people are investing in activewear (Quartz, 2017; Telegraph, 2016), therefore it’s crucial we all become more conscious about our collection of sportswear.

Well, where to begin? What should you consider? Whether you’re thinking of buying something new or reviewing what you already own, here are some of the key questions to ask yourself…

Does it fit you well?

Usability is essential when assessing any area of your wardrobe, especially when it comes to what you’ll wear for exercise. We workout to both look and feel good. If your exercise clothes don’t work for you, you might feel less confident when stepping into the studio and therefore less likely to give your training session everything you’ve got because you’re pre-occupied with your top hugging your tummy too tightly or your leggings slipping down your behind. WRAP has found 30% of clothing in the average wardrobe hasn’t been worn for a year, often because it doesn’t fit anymore. If you’re not using an item because it doesn’t fit quite right, why let it take up precious space in your home?  Only purchase activewear that makes you feel as a great as you do after an amazing workout.

 

How often will you wear it?

Think about your personal style. We’ve all got caught up in fast fashion trends before, seeing our favourite influencers wearing the same print or cut clothing and wanting to be part of it, then a month or two later wondering why we went for something so wacky. Assess why you want the piece you’re considering purchasing. Is it part of a short-lived trend that you’ll regret buying into in a few months time? Think about the items you own that you do and don’t wear regularly. Which pile will this new piece fit into? Do you have other items that will compliment it? Style is about longevity, so pick pieces you know you’ll wear for years of sweaty, stretchy sessions to come.

 

12383293_1684116848531207_72289644_n

Photo source: Cassey Ho

 

How long will it last?

What material is it made from? Does it feel durable? Breathable? Supportive? Are there already bobbles before it’s been bought? Does the stitching look strong enough? There’s nothing worse than diving deep into a squat and hearing your leggings rip, revealing all! Assess the quality of the item, choosing quality over quantity every time.

 

Does the brand ethos align with your values?

Dig a little deeper into the company that made your clothes. What can you find out about their sustainability strategy? Are they socially or environmentally conscious? See if their values align with your own. If it’s the way in which workers are treated that you care about the most, then find out what the company does to ensure fair and safe labour conditions throughout their supply chain. Our perhaps you’re passionate about waste, do they use any recycled fibres in their product? If you can’t find out what you want to know on their website, email or call their head office to find out more. Even if you don’t get the answer you’re looking for, that call or email might trigger internal discussions that get you the answer you want in the future. You are what you wear, only buy into brands that share your beliefs.  

243104-13265792-Screen_Shot_2015-04-04_at_2_49_58_PM_png.png

Photo source: Blair McKarnin

 

Do you need it?

So it fits you well, it matches your personal style, the quality seems high and you love the company’s ethos, but you already have 3 pairs of leggings with a similar print and mesh bottom. Now it’s time to be strict on yourself – how many pairs of leggings do you really need? Say you exercise on average 4 times, and you get really sweaty 2 of those 4 times. Perhaps you need 2 pairs of leggings for the week. Then possibly a spare pair or two in case you can’t wash and dry them in time, or they get an unfixable tear. That’s 4 pairs of leggings you’ll need at the very most. We’re all guilty of owning more than we need. In the UK, a study by Oxfam and M&S (2016) found adults wear just 44% of clothing they own regularly. That’s a waste of resources, money, time and space! Reducing the number of items you have and working towards a more minimalist wardrobe is great for both space saving and avoiding morning outfit stress!

 

Keep an eye out for my next blog post on my sustainable sportswear discoveries coming soon!